A to Z.

1 May

Have been trying to come up with new ways to target auditory memory and word retrieval. I would be eager to hear any of your ideas! Some of my student’s inherited goals are maybe not my favorite—targeting how many syllables are in the sentence a student can repeat back to me, for example, doesn’t feel too functional. In any case, “Free Language Stuff” is one source for inspiration on following directions tasks, which I like for having students follow spoken directions of varying complexity. Last week I played the ever-popular old-school car game “I’m going on vacation, and I’m taking apples, bananas…” with one of my students. It wound up being really interesting just to see what strategies he used to recite every item—-checking out the alphabet posted on the wall, tapping out his responses while going down the page, writing down each item, etc—-and what error patterns popped up. If it’s something that might be useful with your students, feel free to download the visual I made below! I’ll admit, I found myself craving some visual cues by the time we got to Z…

Icky Sticky Frog.

30 Apr

 

This week’s book was Icky Sticky Frog. We have enough copies for each student to hold their own (the tongue/fly attachment on the book is quite the hit), which they always like! Gives us a nice chance to review some of our academic vocabulary (cover, title, author, illustrator, back cover, etc). It’s a nice story for sequencing/recalling: what did the frog eat first? Next? After reading the story we got out a bouncy frog and set up bug visuals around it. The students each got to pick a frog bean bag, bounce it, and label/describe the insect to which their frog landed the closest (e.g. caterpillar: long, green, fuzzy, will be a butterfly). Then we split into two fine motor groups—-one went to make caterpillars with paint, another used tongs to go on a “bug hunt” in two “bean boxes”. Students described the bugs they found. Question of the day: If you could be a bug, what bug would you be (answers were actually pretty great, especially from the students who could answer “why”)? Song: 5 Green & Speckled Frogs

Download: Adaptation of the book (sentence strips). Used to answer wh- questions, expand utterances, target speech sounds (medial /k/, st-, fr-, etc).

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Muncha Muncha Muncha.

24 Apr

I mentioned that one of my Spring favorites is Muncha Muncha Muncha by Candace Fleming. I just think it’s fabulous for sequencing, making predictions, identifying emotions, labeling veggies, etc. In the artic arena, this week I’ve made it work for targeting /k/ and /g/ primarily, but of course could use it for /m/, “ch”, whatever you can find in the story to emphasize!

Click on the pictures below for the following downloads.

1) Images from the book for sequencing. Sadly, the copy machine at work scans these in b&w, so I’d certainly recommend just copying your own, but here they are just in case you’re in a pinch! I laminated 6 scenes from the book and have been using them for sequencing tasks.

2) /k/ & /g/. Very simple visual to send home/use during sessions. Carrot & garden are two targets that can be elicited frequently in the story.

3) Retelling the story. Visuals to help students retell the story. Used with students targeting sequencing/expanding utterances and also with some artic students for carryover tasks.

4) Garden visuals. I can’t find mine right now (grr), but previously had printed these and laminated/velcro-ed them to target spatial concepts and following directions. Includes veggies all discussed in the story, a fence, etc. Included different sizes so directions could be made more complex if needed (e.g. Put the smallest bunny next to the big lettuce, etc).

Hope you enjoy! Could pair this story with the bunny books I shared previously or medial “ch” visuals. I also used it with this fruit/veggie SMARTBoard activity with some of my students.

Surprise Garden.

20 Apr

Sorry for the infrequent posting. A little personal life info: my mom had (planned) major back surgery last week, so I’ve been spending a lot of time in the hospital/rehab. She had some complications with intubation during surgery (or so it seems) and is having some vocal fold/voice issues now. Finally had her first speech therapy session today! Advocacy for the win, SLPs! I felt so grateful to at least have enough knowledge to know that, no, her resultant voice was not normal even with having had a long surgery and, yes, an ENT/SLP should absolutely be involved. And then to politely but firmly demand that they see her. 😉 Voice has never been my favorite area or one I feel super knowledgeable on (bring on the continuing ed!), so it’s time to brush up on it and learn more. Any resources/recommendations (especially for unilateral vocal fold paralysis)?

In any case, just thought I’d share a preview for next week. PreK’s book will be The Surprise Garden by Zoe Hall. Here are the Boardmaker visuals. I know we’ll be talking a lot about attributes as we touch/describe different seeds and will work on sequencing as we plant some. More details to come!

Hope you have a great weekend.

If You Give a Mouse a Cookie.

16 Apr

This week’s book: If You Give a Mouse a Cookie. There are a lot of materials and ideas out there, but wanted to share a few that our program made this week/some tools we loved having for our hour-long speech/motor/social work group. Click above for the SMARTBoard activity my co-worker Kristin and I made. We put a little more effort into this one—hope you enjoy! Focuses on vocabulary from the book and following directions (can make as simple/challenging as you want). Click above also for a sequencing visual (helpful for preK kids starting to retell stories/working on slow, smooth speech/artic targets during less structured tasks). Here are the visuals from the story (part Ipart II).

Some photos from our large group activities are below. We read the story and then split into three groups. One group went with our social worker and used the Toca Tea Party App. Another worked with our occupational therapist, rolling out play doh and using cookie cutters. My group used the Cookie Maker app, which is free! I’d highly recommend it. Awesome for following directions and sequencing. The visuals are great—can really see the dough getting mixed and flattening as you roll it, etc. There’s a donut version that looks even better/more complicated (to use with If You Give a Dog a Donut?). Once the kids had all been through each station, we had snack. Was it a healthy snack? Um, no. They each got an oreo cookie and a chocolate chip one…and then—after a taste test—got to pick one more of whichever was their favorite (hey, calories for the sake of answering wh- questions ;-D). After snack we played “Who Stole the Cookie From the Cookie Jar” (always a favorite, no matter what version…chicken nugget from the Happy Meal, syrup from the pancake stack…).

I love all the Laura Numeroff/Felicia Bond books, but the original does the cause-effect relationship the best! Great story for preK.

Scattergories, Jr.

11 Apr

Today I was all about Scattergories, Jr. with my older kids. My mom, an occupational therapist, recently retired, and I’ve been scooping up her games and materials (score!). I was perhaps the most excited about Scattergories. I used it with two of my language groups today (4th and 6th grade), both of which contain students working on both word finding and vocabulary building. With one of my 5th grade artic groups we just took away the rolling-of-the-letters component and said you got 2 points if you wrote down a word with the /r/ (in any position), their target sound. My last group of the day is composed of 1st/2nd graders, and our sounds of the day were /s/ and /z/. For them I just turned it into a bit of a round-table game show, presenting the items verbally (Your category is “THINGS I’D TAKE ON A PICNIC”. What’s something that has your /s/ or /z/ sound?). They were actually really great at coming up with appropriate responses, and it just made targeting their sounds a little more fun. Here’s the (very simple) worksheet I sent home with some of my kids.

From around the web:

-I liked this quote from an SLP on Scattergories.

-Now I want to try Scattergories Categories

Great take-home worksheet from Heard in Speech. Would definitely work with this activity!

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Free downloads I’m loving today?

Sheets to send home to parents: information on “sh”, “ch”, “th”, /s/, etc. Nice descriptions of strategies to try at home/what is being targeted at school.

Pronouns activity. Many printable sheets with a camping theme targeting he/she/they. Nice visuals—I’m so used to Boardmaker ones!

Step by step drawing visuals. Nice for following directions!

Bunny Books.

10 Apr

Here are a couple of bunny-themed books I made. One was made for expanding utterances (e.g. The bunny ate 3 strawberries). Can be also be used for counting, matching, labeling items, irregular past tense verbs. The other is for targeting spatial concepts. I loved using the bunny books mentioned last week, but for my students it was also helpful to have a variety of spatial concepts (e.g. in front, behind, top, bottom). Hope you find them useful!