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Where Is Dora?

8 May

After spotting this activity on Speech Language Play, I printed and laminated it. Today I used it with one of my students who is just starting to answer “wh” questions consistently with visuals. I hid each box under a post-it note, so he had the added excitement of uncovering each picture scene. I was inspired to make a few similar boards of my own. You can download ones for Dora, Thomas, and Spiderman below. Head on over to Speech Language Play for a nice printout with preposition symbols.

Happy Teacher Appreciation Day to all the fantastic teachers out there! I know that, as a school SLP, I’ve also felt very spoiled this week and it’s fabulous. 🙂 One of my three-year-old boys came in bearing carnations today. Pretty adorable. Enjoy the treats and appreciation!


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Icky Sticky Frog.

30 Apr

 

This week’s book was Icky Sticky Frog. We have enough copies for each student to hold their own (the tongue/fly attachment on the book is quite the hit), which they always like! Gives us a nice chance to review some of our academic vocabulary (cover, title, author, illustrator, back cover, etc). It’s a nice story for sequencing/recalling: what did the frog eat first? Next? After reading the story we got out a bouncy frog and set up bug visuals around it. The students each got to pick a frog bean bag, bounce it, and label/describe the insect to which their frog landed the closest (e.g. caterpillar: long, green, fuzzy, will be a butterfly). Then we split into two fine motor groups—-one went to make caterpillars with paint, another used tongs to go on a “bug hunt” in two “bean boxes”. Students described the bugs they found. Question of the day: If you could be a bug, what bug would you be (answers were actually pretty great, especially from the students who could answer “why”)? Song: 5 Green & Speckled Frogs

Download: Adaptation of the book (sentence strips). Used to answer wh- questions, expand utterances, target speech sounds (medial /k/, st-, fr-, etc).

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Bunny Books.

10 Apr

Here are a couple of bunny-themed books I made. One was made for expanding utterances (e.g. The bunny ate 3 strawberries). Can be also be used for counting, matching, labeling items, irregular past tense verbs. The other is for targeting spatial concepts. I loved using the bunny books mentioned last week, but for my students it was also helpful to have a variety of spatial concepts (e.g. in front, behind, top, bottom). Hope you find them useful!

Very Hungry Caterpillar.

9 Apr

This week’s book was one I’d guess almost everyone has lying around: The Very Hungry Caterpillar. I know my copy is from my parents’ basement; another childhood relic (my parents deserve a lot of gratitude for forming my love for reading—-so many books around!).

Here are a couple of downloads to start us off. Click here for the Boardmaker visuals that coordinate with the story (made by Jordan), and here for a SMARTBoard lesson I made. Have students click and drag the appropriate quantity and fruit label into the boxes and use the visual sentence strip to help answer “What did the caterpillar eat?”.

In our speech/motor group we read the story along with some food visuals and a stuffed animal caterpillar (the kids had to listen for their item and come up and “feed” it to the caterpillar). The kids then colored their favorite fruit from the story on the last page of a book our OT printed out (looking for attributes in the picture and if they could label it correctly). Here’s a similar booklet. Next, we split the class into 2 groups—one out at the SMARTBoard with me. The other picked a fruit visual out of a mystery box and then crawled through the tunnel, matching their fruit to one on the felt board once at the end of the tunnel. For snack the kids counted out 4 crackers/4 pieces of cheese and then got to pick from 2 of the fruits in the story (strawberries and oranges). The kids completed a sequencing/matching task with the visual shown below (egg, caterpillar, cocoon, butterfly). Question of the day: What was your favorite food the caterpillar ate?

In some of my articulation small groups we also read the story. Used to target /v/ (very!), /k/ (caterpillar), st- (He was still hungry!), /f/ medial (butterfly). We made easy caterpillars made out of paper strips (say a word, make your caterpillar longer!).

Links around the internet: DIY felt book/free printable, page of links to many downloads/printables, Eric Carle coloring page, food items/number matching, ABCs from the story, questions to go with the story.

Gratitude, Spot, & Break.

23 Mar

First of all, I was so flattered and excited to be featured over on Playing With Words 365’s Thrifty Thursday post this week! Check out this week and the archives for great ideas on the cheap! Starting up a blog can sometimes feel slow—-how do you get the word out? Are people benefiting from what you post? But this week it has felt great to see lots of visitors (welcome! so happy to have you here). Thanks also to PediaStaff for featuring Elena Marie, SLP on their boards.

I’m off to enjoy one of the perks of being a school-based SLP: Spring Break! Leaving you with a printable book I made yesterday, clearly inspired by Where’s Spot? by Eric Hill. My (25-year-old) copy of the book is ripped to pieces—always have to tell my kids that “baby Miss Elena” wasn’t a very good book owner. Whoops. Used it with a student working on spatial concepts & s-blends. Click on the photo below for some sp- visuals as well (it’s one of my favorite sounds, since you also get SpongeBob and Spiderman ;-D).

Happy Spring Break!

More “Lunch”.

21 Mar

A couple of busy lunch-breaks later, and here are a few more things to share! Just thought I’d post a few photos of some of the previously shared materials in action (I decided to laminate/velcro the printable book I had made to go with Lunch—worked really well with my kids who are working on answering questions/expanding utterances with attributes). And here are a couple of pages I made for a student to target pronouns & word retrieval (page 1, page 2). We brainstormed all the red/yellow/green etc things that he/she/they could eat. In need of more inspiration? Denise Fleming’s website is nice—check out her ideas/downloads for LunchI like the lift-the-flap mouse. Could have students recall different fruits/vegetables from the story to complete the project.

Wednesday’s my day with K-8th graders, which today means: printing/sending progress reports home & seeing a lot of artic groups, a couple of language groups, and having an Annual Review IEP meeting over lunch. Still quite a few meetings on the books before Spring break starts Friday afternoon—feeling the time crunch and I’d guess I’m not alone, school SLPs! We can do it, one day at a time. 🙂

Lunch by Denise Fleming

19 Mar

This week in our motor/speech/language group we’re reading Lunch by Denise Fleming—-one of my favorites! It’s a wonderful book for targeting fruits & vegetables and for making predictions & inferences, and carries over content from last week’s book, in which Bear ate a whole lot of food. My school placement supervisor, Mary, busted Lunch out for a preK large-group lesson back in 2010 and I’ve loved finding ways to utilize it ever since! Nerdy info: my mom ordered me a used copy off Amazon last year for Christmas and it just happened to be signed by the author! Win. 😉

Very possible I’ll share more materials as the week goes on, but for now here are some downloads/ideas for how we’ve used the story:

-Boardmaker visuals to go along with the story: Part I, Part II

Printable book I made to go along with the story (target colors/fruits/veggies/expanding utterances! Have student fill in circle w/appropriate color)

SMARTBoard activity using food from the story; matching colors + items

“Why Question” visuals for Lunch

Play-based: had the kids feed an alligator puppet plastic fruits/veggies of their choosing after saying a sentence (target: “Eat the…yellow banana”, though was pleasantly surprised with some of our kids busting out utterances along the lines of “Mr. Alligator, would you like one yellow banana? And then another banana?”). Have also used this with categorizing fruits/veggies—e.g. have the puppet ONLY want to eat veggies.

Awesome sandwich-sequencing game from Melissa & Doug. Have students label all the possible sandwich ingredients and then take turns building a sandwich from the card, providing assistance as needed.

-More fruits/veggies: Boardmaker visuals (recommend printing/laminating/velcroing so kids can sort onto veggie or fruit board), SMARTBoard activity to categorize (made by Jordan)