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Icky Sticky Frog.

30 Apr

 

This week’s book was Icky Sticky Frog. We have enough copies for each student to hold their own (the tongue/fly attachment on the book is quite the hit), which they always like! Gives us a nice chance to review some of our academic vocabulary (cover, title, author, illustrator, back cover, etc). It’s a nice story for sequencing/recalling: what did the frog eat first? Next? After reading the story we got out a bouncy frog and set up bug visuals around it. The students each got to pick a frog bean bag, bounce it, and label/describe the insect to which their frog landed the closest (e.g. caterpillar: long, green, fuzzy, will be a butterfly). Then we split into two fine motor groups—-one went to make caterpillars with paint, another used tongs to go on a “bug hunt” in two “bean boxes”. Students described the bugs they found. Question of the day: If you could be a bug, what bug would you be (answers were actually pretty great, especially from the students who could answer “why”)? Song: 5 Green & Speckled Frogs

Download: Adaptation of the book (sentence strips). Used to answer wh- questions, expand utterances, target speech sounds (medial /k/, st-, fr-, etc).

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Muncha Muncha Muncha.

24 Apr

I mentioned that one of my Spring favorites is Muncha Muncha Muncha by Candace Fleming. I just think it’s fabulous for sequencing, making predictions, identifying emotions, labeling veggies, etc. In the artic arena, this week I’ve made it work for targeting /k/ and /g/ primarily, but of course could use it for /m/, “ch”, whatever you can find in the story to emphasize!

Click on the pictures below for the following downloads.

1) Images from the book for sequencing. Sadly, the copy machine at work scans these in b&w, so I’d certainly recommend just copying your own, but here they are just in case you’re in a pinch! I laminated 6 scenes from the book and have been using them for sequencing tasks.

2) /k/ & /g/. Very simple visual to send home/use during sessions. Carrot & garden are two targets that can be elicited frequently in the story.

3) Retelling the story. Visuals to help students retell the story. Used with students targeting sequencing/expanding utterances and also with some artic students for carryover tasks.

4) Garden visuals. I can’t find mine right now (grr), but previously had printed these and laminated/velcro-ed them to target spatial concepts and following directions. Includes veggies all discussed in the story, a fence, etc. Included different sizes so directions could be made more complex if needed (e.g. Put the smallest bunny next to the big lettuce, etc).

Hope you enjoy! Could pair this story with the bunny books I shared previously or medial “ch” visuals. I also used it with this fruit/veggie SMARTBoard activity with some of my students.

Surprise Garden.

20 Apr

Sorry for the infrequent posting. A little personal life info: my mom had (planned) major back surgery last week, so I’ve been spending a lot of time in the hospital/rehab. She had some complications with intubation during surgery (or so it seems) and is having some vocal fold/voice issues now. Finally had her first speech therapy session today! Advocacy for the win, SLPs! I felt so grateful to at least have enough knowledge to know that, no, her resultant voice was not normal even with having had a long surgery and, yes, an ENT/SLP should absolutely be involved. And then to politely but firmly demand that they see her. 😉 Voice has never been my favorite area or one I feel super knowledgeable on (bring on the continuing ed!), so it’s time to brush up on it and learn more. Any resources/recommendations (especially for unilateral vocal fold paralysis)?

In any case, just thought I’d share a preview for next week. PreK’s book will be The Surprise Garden by Zoe Hall. Here are the Boardmaker visuals. I know we’ll be talking a lot about attributes as we touch/describe different seeds and will work on sequencing as we plant some. More details to come!

Hope you have a great weekend.

If You Give a Mouse a Cookie.

16 Apr

This week’s book: If You Give a Mouse a Cookie. There are a lot of materials and ideas out there, but wanted to share a few that our program made this week/some tools we loved having for our hour-long speech/motor/social work group. Click above for the SMARTBoard activity my co-worker Kristin and I made. We put a little more effort into this one—hope you enjoy! Focuses on vocabulary from the book and following directions (can make as simple/challenging as you want). Click above also for a sequencing visual (helpful for preK kids starting to retell stories/working on slow, smooth speech/artic targets during less structured tasks). Here are the visuals from the story (part Ipart II).

Some photos from our large group activities are below. We read the story and then split into three groups. One group went with our social worker and used the Toca Tea Party App. Another worked with our occupational therapist, rolling out play doh and using cookie cutters. My group used the Cookie Maker app, which is free! I’d highly recommend it. Awesome for following directions and sequencing. The visuals are great—can really see the dough getting mixed and flattening as you roll it, etc. There’s a donut version that looks even better/more complicated (to use with If You Give a Dog a Donut?). Once the kids had all been through each station, we had snack. Was it a healthy snack? Um, no. They each got an oreo cookie and a chocolate chip one…and then—after a taste test—got to pick one more of whichever was their favorite (hey, calories for the sake of answering wh- questions ;-D). After snack we played “Who Stole the Cookie From the Cookie Jar” (always a favorite, no matter what version…chicken nugget from the Happy Meal, syrup from the pancake stack…).

I love all the Laura Numeroff/Felicia Bond books, but the original does the cause-effect relationship the best! Great story for preK.

Very Hungry Caterpillar.

9 Apr

This week’s book was one I’d guess almost everyone has lying around: The Very Hungry Caterpillar. I know my copy is from my parents’ basement; another childhood relic (my parents deserve a lot of gratitude for forming my love for reading—-so many books around!).

Here are a couple of downloads to start us off. Click here for the Boardmaker visuals that coordinate with the story (made by Jordan), and here for a SMARTBoard lesson I made. Have students click and drag the appropriate quantity and fruit label into the boxes and use the visual sentence strip to help answer “What did the caterpillar eat?”.

In our speech/motor group we read the story along with some food visuals and a stuffed animal caterpillar (the kids had to listen for their item and come up and “feed” it to the caterpillar). The kids then colored their favorite fruit from the story on the last page of a book our OT printed out (looking for attributes in the picture and if they could label it correctly). Here’s a similar booklet. Next, we split the class into 2 groups—one out at the SMARTBoard with me. The other picked a fruit visual out of a mystery box and then crawled through the tunnel, matching their fruit to one on the felt board once at the end of the tunnel. For snack the kids counted out 4 crackers/4 pieces of cheese and then got to pick from 2 of the fruits in the story (strawberries and oranges). The kids completed a sequencing/matching task with the visual shown below (egg, caterpillar, cocoon, butterfly). Question of the day: What was your favorite food the caterpillar ate?

In some of my articulation small groups we also read the story. Used to target /v/ (very!), /k/ (caterpillar), st- (He was still hungry!), /f/ medial (butterfly). We made easy caterpillars made out of paper strips (say a word, make your caterpillar longer!).

Links around the internet: DIY felt book/free printable, page of links to many downloads/printables, Eric Carle coloring page, food items/number matching, ABCs from the story, questions to go with the story.

A Fly Eatin’ Old Lady.

5 Apr

This week’s book was “There Was An Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly.” In our large group, we read the story (having the kids predict what animal she would eat next and practice sequencing—-which animal did she eat first? next? last?) and then retold it using a felt board/props. During the story we had each kid hold a prop (animal) and, when they heard theirs, come up and feed it to the Old Lady puppet we had (similar to this). With the felt board, we had the kids try to remember all the animals in order with no visuals. They were actually pretty darn awesome at this (especially for it being the first day after break!). We also took away an animal or two and checked to see if they could tell us which one was missing. Question of the day: Which animal from the story was your favorite (no visuals, though of course would’ve provided if needed)? Snack: apple slices + marshmallows (count out 5!) to make a mouth & teeth. We also have some great Scholastic DVDs and had the chance to watch the story at the end of our group. Highly recommend these!

In the artic arena, the repetitious nature of the story made targeting sw- (swallowed)/sp- (spider), /k/ (cow, cat) —or plenty of other sounds— easy! And here are a couple materials I made: a sheet with all the animals from the story for cutting them out/sequencing them, a sheet with the animals and “She ate _____” visual (which I sent home with all of my classroom kids).

P.S. Stumbled across Consonantly Speaking’s resource page yesterday and am excited to look through the many, many SLP blogs listed! If you’re loving any blogs (or have started your own), would love to hear about them!

1, 2, 3 to the Zoo

18 Mar

Just thought I’d share a book I made last year to target /z/ initial: “1,2,3 to the Zoo”, to go along with the Eric Carle picture book. Could also be used to target matching, labeling zoo animals, plurals, counting, making predictions, etc. I just had students paste the appropriate animal on each page and, depending on their level of practice, typically help me complete the phrase “1 elephant at the ________” to elicit initial /z/.

More /z/: here’s a basic page I made with the phrase “The zookeeper helps…”. I typically print out several copies of this page and let the kids pick whichever animals they would like to finish it (visuals here). Already shared this one, but here’s the /z/ initial story I made up as well.

Over at Autumn’s powerpoint site she has a great “Zoo” one that lets the kids guess which animal is next (great sound effects & visuals). Another nice way to elicit /z/! Was set up for targeting making inferences, so could also be great for that! In play I like to use zoo/farm animals and have the kids categorize them and tell me where the animals live. For word lists/practice in the medial and final positions, check out Mommy Speech Therapy.