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Muncha Muncha Muncha.

24 Apr

I mentioned that one of my Spring favorites is Muncha Muncha Muncha by Candace Fleming. I just think it’s fabulous for sequencing, making predictions, identifying emotions, labeling veggies, etc. In the artic arena, this week I’ve made it work for targeting /k/ and /g/ primarily, but of course could use it for /m/, “ch”, whatever you can find in the story to emphasize!

Click on the pictures below for the following downloads.

1) Images from the book for sequencing. Sadly, the copy machine at work scans these in b&w, so I’d certainly recommend just copying your own, but here they are just in case you’re in a pinch! I laminated 6 scenes from the book and have been using them for sequencing tasks.

2) /k/ & /g/. Very simple visual to send home/use during sessions. Carrot & garden are two targets that can be elicited frequently in the story.

3) Retelling the story. Visuals to help students retell the story. Used with students targeting sequencing/expanding utterances and also with some artic students for carryover tasks.

4) Garden visuals. I can’t find mine right now (grr), but previously had printed these and laminated/velcro-ed them to target spatial concepts and following directions. Includes veggies all discussed in the story, a fence, etc. Included different sizes so directions could be made more complex if needed (e.g. Put the smallest bunny next to the big lettuce, etc).

Hope you enjoy! Could pair this story with the bunny books I shared previously or medial “ch” visuals. I also used it with this fruit/veggie SMARTBoard activity with some of my students.

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Scattergories, Jr.

11 Apr

Today I was all about Scattergories, Jr. with my older kids. My mom, an occupational therapist, recently retired, and I’ve been scooping up her games and materials (score!). I was perhaps the most excited about Scattergories. I used it with two of my language groups today (4th and 6th grade), both of which contain students working on both word finding and vocabulary building. With one of my 5th grade artic groups we just took away the rolling-of-the-letters component and said you got 2 points if you wrote down a word with the /r/ (in any position), their target sound. My last group of the day is composed of 1st/2nd graders, and our sounds of the day were /s/ and /z/. For them I just turned it into a bit of a round-table game show, presenting the items verbally (Your category is “THINGS I’D TAKE ON A PICNIC”. What’s something that has your /s/ or /z/ sound?). They were actually really great at coming up with appropriate responses, and it just made targeting their sounds a little more fun. Here’s the (very simple) worksheet I sent home with some of my kids.

From around the web:

-I liked this quote from an SLP on Scattergories.

-Now I want to try Scattergories Categories

Great take-home worksheet from Heard in Speech. Would definitely work with this activity!

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Free downloads I’m loving today?

Sheets to send home to parents: information on “sh”, “ch”, “th”, /s/, etc. Nice descriptions of strategies to try at home/what is being targeted at school.

Pronouns activity. Many printable sheets with a camping theme targeting he/she/they. Nice visuals—I’m so used to Boardmaker ones!

Step by step drawing visuals. Nice for following directions!

“Ch”

2 Apr

First day back from Spring break!

Can’t say I’m feeling terribly organized today, but thought I’d start off the week by sharing a few “ch” visuals I’ve made. I forgot to include a “ch” story in my “Articulation Stories” post, so figured I’d better get it to you. Hope your week is off to a great start!

-“Chewbacca sees…” + choices

“Ch” verbs

“Ch” medial foods

She/He chooses

“Ch” story

Lunch by Denise Fleming

19 Mar

This week in our motor/speech/language group we’re reading Lunch by Denise Fleming—-one of my favorites! It’s a wonderful book for targeting fruits & vegetables and for making predictions & inferences, and carries over content from last week’s book, in which Bear ate a whole lot of food. My school placement supervisor, Mary, busted Lunch out for a preK large-group lesson back in 2010 and I’ve loved finding ways to utilize it ever since! Nerdy info: my mom ordered me a used copy off Amazon last year for Christmas and it just happened to be signed by the author! Win. 😉

Very possible I’ll share more materials as the week goes on, but for now here are some downloads/ideas for how we’ve used the story:

-Boardmaker visuals to go along with the story: Part I, Part II

Printable book I made to go along with the story (target colors/fruits/veggies/expanding utterances! Have student fill in circle w/appropriate color)

SMARTBoard activity using food from the story; matching colors + items

“Why Question” visuals for Lunch

Play-based: had the kids feed an alligator puppet plastic fruits/veggies of their choosing after saying a sentence (target: “Eat the…yellow banana”, though was pleasantly surprised with some of our kids busting out utterances along the lines of “Mr. Alligator, would you like one yellow banana? And then another banana?”). Have also used this with categorizing fruits/veggies—e.g. have the puppet ONLY want to eat veggies.

Awesome sandwich-sequencing game from Melissa & Doug. Have students label all the possible sandwich ingredients and then take turns building a sandwich from the card, providing assistance as needed.

-More fruits/veggies: Boardmaker visuals (recommend printing/laminating/velcroing so kids can sort onto veggie or fruit board), SMARTBoard activity to categorize (made by Jordan)