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Things That Go.

4 Jun

Working with 3-5-year-olds, vehicles tend to be a big favorite (okay, with the boys). Here are some Thomas the Tank Engine/basic concepts books I posted earlier, and here is a SMARTBoard activity I made to target labeling vehicles/categorizing them into land/sky (I just used it on my laptop). I printed out similar visuals and laminated the board/pieces to velcro onto it. Here’s a sentence strip visual for pairing color + vehicle (used with students requesting different toy vehicles).

Downloads I like from around the web: transportation unit over on Speech Lady Liz, Air vs. Land vehicles (printables), “count the syllables” vehicles (interactive), big vs. little vehicle visuals, sentence strips with vehicle + location. Favorite related iPad app is Peek a Boo Vehicles. There are some nice interactive Thomas puzzles and stories out there on iTunes, too.

Bonus: Summer BINGO boards my co-worker, Jordan, made. Enjoy! (Version 1, 2, 3, 4)

Dolls & Princesses.

11 May

Happy Friday!

Here are a couple of simple SMARTBoard activities. Could be used to target spatial concepts receptively or expressively, following directions, medial or final /s/ at the phrase level (Where’s the dog? In the castle/doll house), labeling furniture or rooms of the house, etc. Enjoy!

Have a wonderful weekend. I know I need to work on 5ish IEPs today, so time to get crackin’! May, you are intense.

Round-Up.

3 May

Time to share a few random things I’ve made and loved this week.

Made by me: Garden SMARTBoard activity (made from the visuals I had laminated/velcroed for Muncha Muncha Muncha. Can use for labeling veggies, following multi-step directions, spatial concepts, etc) + what I sent home to parents, in case you’re looking for inspiration. Here’s a powerpoint targeting /v/ in all positions of words (very simple). A visual to help retell We’re Going on a Lion Hunt. Worksheet for medial /t/ and /d/.

Found around the web: Love this 4-step sequencing download over on Boardmaker Share. Slapples to Slapples: an Apples/Apples-ish adjective game (I just downloaded the free preview for now! Loved using it with my 4-6th grade students). And I want to take advantage of these: sequencing cards that go with books (for preK-1st grade).

And an article I loved reading: “7 Things You Don’t Know About a Special Needs Parent“.

Have a great weekend!

Muncha Muncha Muncha.

24 Apr

I mentioned that one of my Spring favorites is Muncha Muncha Muncha by Candace Fleming. I just think it’s fabulous for sequencing, making predictions, identifying emotions, labeling veggies, etc. In the artic arena, this week I’ve made it work for targeting /k/ and /g/ primarily, but of course could use it for /m/, “ch”, whatever you can find in the story to emphasize!

Click on the pictures below for the following downloads.

1) Images from the book for sequencing. Sadly, the copy machine at work scans these in b&w, so I’d certainly recommend just copying your own, but here they are just in case you’re in a pinch! I laminated 6 scenes from the book and have been using them for sequencing tasks.

2) /k/ & /g/. Very simple visual to send home/use during sessions. Carrot & garden are two targets that can be elicited frequently in the story.

3) Retelling the story. Visuals to help students retell the story. Used with students targeting sequencing/expanding utterances and also with some artic students for carryover tasks.

4) Garden visuals. I can’t find mine right now (grr), but previously had printed these and laminated/velcro-ed them to target spatial concepts and following directions. Includes veggies all discussed in the story, a fence, etc. Included different sizes so directions could be made more complex if needed (e.g. Put the smallest bunny next to the big lettuce, etc).

Hope you enjoy! Could pair this story with the bunny books I shared previously or medial “ch” visuals. I also used it with this fruit/veggie SMARTBoard activity with some of my students.

If You Give a Mouse a Cookie.

16 Apr

This week’s book: If You Give a Mouse a Cookie. There are a lot of materials and ideas out there, but wanted to share a few that our program made this week/some tools we loved having for our hour-long speech/motor/social work group. Click above for the SMARTBoard activity my co-worker Kristin and I made. We put a little more effort into this one—hope you enjoy! Focuses on vocabulary from the book and following directions (can make as simple/challenging as you want). Click above also for a sequencing visual (helpful for preK kids starting to retell stories/working on slow, smooth speech/artic targets during less structured tasks). Here are the visuals from the story (part Ipart II).

Some photos from our large group activities are below. We read the story and then split into three groups. One group went with our social worker and used the Toca Tea Party App. Another worked with our occupational therapist, rolling out play doh and using cookie cutters. My group used the Cookie Maker app, which is free! I’d highly recommend it. Awesome for following directions and sequencing. The visuals are great—can really see the dough getting mixed and flattening as you roll it, etc. There’s a donut version that looks even better/more complicated (to use with If You Give a Dog a Donut?). Once the kids had all been through each station, we had snack. Was it a healthy snack? Um, no. They each got an oreo cookie and a chocolate chip one…and then—after a taste test—got to pick one more of whichever was their favorite (hey, calories for the sake of answering wh- questions ;-D). After snack we played “Who Stole the Cookie From the Cookie Jar” (always a favorite, no matter what version…chicken nugget from the Happy Meal, syrup from the pancake stack…).

I love all the Laura Numeroff/Felicia Bond books, but the original does the cause-effect relationship the best! Great story for preK.

Very Hungry Caterpillar.

9 Apr

This week’s book was one I’d guess almost everyone has lying around: The Very Hungry Caterpillar. I know my copy is from my parents’ basement; another childhood relic (my parents deserve a lot of gratitude for forming my love for reading—-so many books around!).

Here are a couple of downloads to start us off. Click here for the Boardmaker visuals that coordinate with the story (made by Jordan), and here for a SMARTBoard lesson I made. Have students click and drag the appropriate quantity and fruit label into the boxes and use the visual sentence strip to help answer “What did the caterpillar eat?”.

In our speech/motor group we read the story along with some food visuals and a stuffed animal caterpillar (the kids had to listen for their item and come up and “feed” it to the caterpillar). The kids then colored their favorite fruit from the story on the last page of a book our OT printed out (looking for attributes in the picture and if they could label it correctly). Here’s a similar booklet. Next, we split the class into 2 groups—one out at the SMARTBoard with me. The other picked a fruit visual out of a mystery box and then crawled through the tunnel, matching their fruit to one on the felt board once at the end of the tunnel. For snack the kids counted out 4 crackers/4 pieces of cheese and then got to pick from 2 of the fruits in the story (strawberries and oranges). The kids completed a sequencing/matching task with the visual shown below (egg, caterpillar, cocoon, butterfly). Question of the day: What was your favorite food the caterpillar ate?

In some of my articulation small groups we also read the story. Used to target /v/ (very!), /k/ (caterpillar), st- (He was still hungry!), /f/ medial (butterfly). We made easy caterpillars made out of paper strips (say a word, make your caterpillar longer!).

Links around the internet: DIY felt book/free printable, page of links to many downloads/printables, Eric Carle coloring page, food items/number matching, ABCs from the story, questions to go with the story.

Spring Has Sprung!

4 Apr

Well, the “snowman” materials have finally been put away. This week I’ve been about all-things-Spring! Will share a few simple things I’ve made so far along with some of my favorite materials from around the web.

You can click on the pictures below to download a pronoun/expanding utterance worksheet I made up along with the visuals to go in the blank spaces (He wants four bunnies! They want six Easter eggs). Also thought I’d share a Boardmaker activity I made last year (sorry, for this one you’d need the program as it’s interactive)—lets the kids make their own silly spring/garden story up on the SMARTboard (or on the computer).

Last night I downloaded a bunch of the Easter/Spring apps that Jenna recommended over on Speech Room News. I let some of my artic kids take a shot at “whack-an-egg” after practicing their target words (it was a hit!). I used this “bunnies everywhere” book from Chapel Hill Snippets earlier this week and will probably use it again tomorrow with one of my kids working on basic concepts/expanding utterances. I think I’ll have to use this “Very Hungry Bunny” book from Playing With Words 365, too!

I think I borrowed it from the school’s library for most of last year (oops), but finally put in an order for my favorite spring book: Muncha, Muncha, Muncha by Candace Fleming. Will have to do a post on it soon, but for now I’ll just highly recommend it (for fruits/veggies, making predictions, sequencing events, etc)! What are your favorite “spring” children’s books?

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